| Chapter 26: The New Imperialism in Africa and Southeast Asia, 1830–1914
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> Chapter 26
Chapter 26: The New Imperialism in Africa and Southeast Asia, 1830–1914


MP3 Chapter Summaries

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Learning Objectives

Major concepts of the chapter that you should be familiar with.
  • After having read the chapter, students should be able to
  • Discuss what is meant by the new imperialism.
  • Explain how religious, pseudo-scientific ideologies and nationalism encouraged the new imperialism.
  • Discuss how the Europeans took advantage of the internal tensions between African chiefdoms in order to establish political, military, and economic control.
  • Discuss how the scramble for Africa was exacerbated by competition between European countries and the role played by Leopold of Belgium.
  • Describe the spread of Islamic reform in West Africa and its connection to Sufi brotherhoods, and relate it to Fodio’s jihad.
  • Describe the mfecane tactics, adopted by Shaka and the Zulu, and what impact they had on the chiefdoms of Southern Africa.
  • Discuss the relationship between the British and the Boers in Cape Town and the South African interior and what that relationship meant for the native peoples of the area.
  • Explain the syncretism of Nongqawuse and how her prophecies inadvertently led to the British conquest of the Xhosa.
  • Describe some of the technological innovations that allowed Europeans to easily conquer the continent of Africa.
  • Explain how the British came to be in charge of Egypt and what role the Suez Canal played in that shift in power.
  • Explain what Mahdi means and how the Sudanese used that title to unify resistance to British control of the upper Nile Valley.
  • Compare and contrast the causes and results of the Asante and Maji Maji revolts.
  • Explain how the French formed the Federation of Indochina and what they hoped to gain from the region.
  • Discuss the U.S. approach to forming an empire in Asia, through the acquisition of the Philippines and Hawaii.
  • Describe how a commodity like rubber could be transplanted from one European empire to another and how such natural resources profited the imperialist powers.
  • Describe the policies by which Ethiopia and Siam remained free of European imperialism.



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