Houghton Mifflin Textbook -
InstructorsStudentsReviewersAuthorsBooksellers Contact Us
  DisciplineHome
 TextbookHome
 ResourceHome
 StudentTextbookSite
Textbook Site for:
The Brief American Pageant , Sixth Edition
David M. Kennedy, Stanford University
Lizabeth Cohen, Harvard University
Thomas A. Bailey
Mel Piehl, Valparaiso University
Primary Sources


Introduction | Questions to Consider | Source


Country of Origin and Year of Entry into the U.S.
(1997)
U.S. Census Bureau

Instructors' Note
In March 1996, 9.3 percent (24.6 million) of the U.S. population were foreign born. During the twentieth century, the percentage who were foreign born declined from a high of 14.7 percent in 1910, to a low of 4.8 percent in 1970. Since then, the percentage has increased steadily. More than one-quarter of the foreign-born population of the United States has come into this country since 1990, and another 34.3 percent entered during the 1980s. The remaining 38.9 percent have been here more than 15 years. As students analyze the chart, make sure they understand the impact the large number of Hispanic immigrants has on the United States. As they compare the figures in the last section of the chart, make sure they remember that figures from the decade of the 1990s are incomplete. (You can find similar exercises by searching for "immigration" on this CD.)



Introduction
The foreign-born population in the United States is not homogeneous. There are great differences in their demographic, social, and economic characteristics, not only based on country of origin but also related to how long they have lived here and whether they have become citizens. For instance, recent arrivals to this country are more likely to be poor, have lower incomes, and higher unemployment rates than the native born. But foreign-born people who have been here more than six years seem to have overcome their initial economic hardships. In fact, those who arrived during the 1970s are doing as well as natives in terms of income in 1997.

Questions to Consider
  1. From the figures in the chart, what is the country of origin of most U.S. immigrants?

  2. What region of the world is the birthplace of most U.S. immigrants?

  3. After examining the figures in the second part of the chart, explain the trend you see.

  4. Speculate on the effects of these changing immigration patterns on the nation's political and social activities.



Source


COUNTRY OF ORIGIN AND YEAR OF ENTRY INTO THE U.S. OF THE FOREIGN BORN, BY CITIZENSHIP STATUS: MARCH 1997


 (Numbers in thousands)

Total Foreign-born

Country of Origin

Number

Percent

All Countries

25,779

100.0

Mexico
Cuba
Dominican Republic
El Salvador
Great Britian
China and Hong Kong
India
Korea
Philippines
Vietnam
Elsewhere



7,017
913
632
607
606
1,107
748
591
1,132
770
11,655



27.2
3.5
2.5
2.4
2.4
4.3
2.9
2.3
4.4
3.0
45.2



Came to the United States

  
All years of entry

25,779

100.0

Before 1970
1970 to 1979
1980 to 1989
Since 1990

4,749
4,935
8,555
7,539

18.4
19.1
33.2
29.2



 


BORDER=0
BORDER="0"