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> Chapter 31 > Improve Your Grade > Applying What You Have Learned
Improve Your Grade

Work with these documents and activities to master chapter learning objectives.

Applying What You Have Learned


American Life in the “Roaring Twenties,” 1919–1929

PART III: Applying What You Have Learned

1. How and why did America turn toward domestic isolation and social conservatism in the 1920s?

2. How was the character of American culture affected by the social and political changes of the 1920s? (Include both white ethnic groups and blacks in your discussion.)

3. Why was immigration, which had been part of American experience for many generations, seen as such a great threat to American identity and culture in the prosperous 1920s? How did the severe and discriminatory immigration restriction laws passed in the 1920s affect the country?

4. Why did critics, like Horace Kallen and Randolph Bourne, dislike the pressure on immigrants to Americanize and join the melting pot? What kind of future America did their ideals of cultural pluralism promote. Why was this view not widely accepted in the 1920s?

5. How did the Eighteenth Amendment outlawing alcohol both reflect and deepen the cultural divisions in the United States, including urban-rural conflicts?

6. How did some of the major public events of the 1920s reflect national disagreements over fundamental social, cultural, and religious values?

7. How did the automobile and other new products create a mass-consumption economy in the 1920s?

8. How did the new films, literature, and music of the 1920s affect American values in areas of religion, sexuality, and family life?

9. How and why did African Americans in the Harlem Renaissance and elsewhere begin celebrating racial pride and the New Negro in the 1920s? Was Marcus Garvey’s movement to encourage black migration to Africa an expression of that same spirit or a reflection of the still-harsh oppression that most blacks experienced?

10. In what ways were the twenties a vigorous social and cultural reaction against the progressive movement in the decades leading up to World War I (see Chapters 29, 30, and 31)? Was this hostility to progressivism primarily a result of disillusionment with the outcome of the war or a reflection of the limits of progressive reform itself?



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