To College Division Homepage Writing Online: A Student's Guide to the Internet and World Wide Web
 CROSSLINKS: Chapter 14—Evaluating Sources

Chapter 14 of Writing Online offers advice for finding and evaluating sources, tips for managing Internet information, and things to consider about citing sources, fair use, and copyright. The Crosslinks for this chapter lead sample copyright statements and sample letters for requesting copyright permission; essays and web sites on copyright and fair use; links to art resources—search engines, clip art sites, and image manipulation sites—and advice on using sources rhetorically and evaluating sources.


| Statements and Letters | Fair Use and Copyright | Art Resources | Using and Evaluating Sources | Crosslinks by Chapter |
Statements and Letters 

| Statements and Letters | Fair Use and Copyright | Art Resources | Using and Evaluating Sources | Crosslinks by Chapter |
Fair Use and Copyright 
  • Copyright overview by Nolo Legal Encyclopedia.  This site provides understandable overviews of copyright, trademark, fair use, and intellectual property, all legal concepts you will need to be familiar with as you work online. 
  • 10 Big Myths about Copyright Explained by Brad Templeton, an electronic newspaper publisher, offers advice on copyright. Presented in layman's terms, this site is frequently listed and linked to by law schools and lawyers. So although Templeton is not a lawyer, the site offers good guidelines and rules of thumb. Also see his brief introduction to copyright.  
  • Fair Use for Teaching and Research from the Copyright Management Center for Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) offers an introduction to Fair Use and a useful fair use checklist. However, don't use the checklist until after you read the introductory materials. 
  • Illustrative Scenarios for fair use from the Consortium for Educational Technology in University Systems (CETUS) offer examples of the kinds of uses of material on the WWW and Internet that affect fair use. After consulting Nolo above, visit these scenarios to see one way the law might play out in practice. 

| Statements and Letters | Fair Use and Copyright | Art Resources | Using and Evaluating Sources | Crosslinks by Chapter |
Art Resources 

| Statements and Letters | Fair Use and Copyright | Art Resources | Using and Evaluating Sources | Crosslinks by Chapter |
Using and Evaluating Sources 
  • Bibliography on Evaluating Internet Resources by Nicole Auer contains links to web sites that offer evaluation guides, articles that suggest principles for evaluating sources, a bibliography of print resources, and a list of email discussion groups that focus on assessing Internet information.
  • Evaluating Internet Research Resources by Robert Harris offers some of the wisest advice on judging sources. Harris's easy-to-read essay reminds you to consider the information rhetorically, in light of the purpose and context of your research and the purpose and context of the source itself. He offers good suggestions for learning more about a source's context and how others use it and view it. For any teacher, this piece makes a great handout.
  • Biases Affecting Information Processing by Robert Harris explains some of the biases we bring with us when we encounter information and ideas. Read this and keep a mental checklist to make sure you don't dismiss some ideas too soon or accept others too readily.
  • The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly or Why It's a Good Idea to Evaluate Web Sources by Susan E. Beck offers four units: suggestions for successful Internet assignments, a bibliography, criteria for evaluating sources, and links to example web sites. You can view the criteria and then use the sample sites to apply them.
  • Using Outside Sources is a complete instructional unit on using and integrating sources. It comes from the Writing Center at Colorado State Univeristy and is one of their Guides to Working with Sources.
  • Integrating Sources into a Paper by Gordon Harvey was written as part of his guide for Harvard students, Working with Sources. "Integrating" offers good tips on using sources effectively—accurately and rhetorically—in your writing. Note: the third chapter of the manual, "Misuse of Sources," gives sound advice on ways to avoid mistakes and on what to do if you find a source that says the same thing you do, only after you've come to your own conclusions.
  • Drafting the Research Paper/Integrating Sources by Kathy Walsh of Central Oregon Community College gives smart advice on how to approach writing your sources effectively and accurately into your text.
  • Using Your Sources is from the Folke Bernadotte Memorial Library; it offers good advice on how to think about creating a voice for your paper and letting your thesis and thinking, rather than your sources, drive your writing. It's part of their larger Library Research Tutorial.


| Statements and Letters | Fair Use and Copyright | Art Resources | Using and Evaluating Sources | Crosslinks by Chapter |

CROSSLINKS START     HOME

Crosslinks by Chapter