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 CROSSLINKS: Chapter 12—What Is Research Online?

Chapter 12 of Writing Online describes research online—both how it's integrated with research in general and how it's often a necessary component of any research project. The chapter also discusses how online research can foster research as conversation. The Crosslinks below take you essays about research, links to articles on evaluating web sources, and ideas for research projects.


| Essays and Advice | How to Evaluate Web Sources | Research Project Ideas | Crosslinks by Chapter |
Essays and Advice 
  • Online Research Tutorials from the Washington State University Libraries offer an excellent interactive guide to understanding and planning your research project. This site takes into account how to use both library and web-based resources.
  • A Research Overview is a PowerPoint presentation on research by Kathy Belew; it's part of a larger research project she conducted with Barbara Morrison-Rodriguez into Combating Maternal Drug Addiction. The first ten slides are excellent for a good overview of what research is, after that, the slides go into the specifics of Belew's research. The whole site offers a good example of using the WWW to present a rich and complex research project.
  • An Introduction to Research Processes is a unit on research from the Writing Center at Colorado State University. Guidelines cover library, Internet, field research, and how to combine all three types of research in one project. 
  • Doing Research on the World Wide Web is a guide by the reference staff of Kent State University's Libraries. Note: Many college and university libraries offer similar guides and tips tailored to the resources on their campus. You should visit your library's web pages to see what guides and tutorials they offer. 

| Essays and Advice | How to Evaluate Web Sources | Research Project Ideas | Crosslinks by Chapter |
How to Evaluate Web Sources 
  • Bibliography on Evaluating Internet Resources by Nicole Auer contains links to web sites that offer evaluation guides, articles that suggest principles for evaluating sources, a bibliography of print resources, and a list of email discussion groups that focus on assessing Internet information.
  • Evaluating Internet Research Resources by Robert Harris offers some of the wisest advice on judging sources. Harris's easy to read essay reminds you to consider the information rhetorically, in light of the purpose and context of your research and the purpose and context of the source itself. He offers good suggestions for learning more about a source's context and how others use it and view it. For any teacher, this piece makes a great handout.
  • Biases Affecting Information Processing by Robert Harris explains some of the biases we bring with us when we encounter information and ideas. Read this and keep a mental checklist to make sure you don't dismiss some ideas too soon or accept others too readily.
  • The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly or Why It's a Good Idea to Evaluate Web Sources by Susan E. Beck offers four units: suggestions for successful Internet assignments, a bibliography, criteria for evaluating sources, and links to example web sites. You can view the criteria and then use the sample sites to apply them.

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| Essays and Advice | How to Evaluate Web Sources | Research Project Ideas | Crosslinks by Chapter |
Research Project Ideas 

| Essays and Advice | How to Evaluate Web Sources | Research Project Ideas | Crosslinks by Chapter |

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