| Chapter 6: Narration
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> Chapter 6
Chapter 6: Narration

Chapter introduction:

To narrate is to tell a story that explains what happened, when it happened, and who was involved.

A news report may be a narrative telling how a man was rescued from icy flood waters or how a brave whistle blower risked her career and perhaps her life to expose an employer's harmful practices. When you read a bedtime story to a child, you are reading a narrative. In a college paper on campus drug use, telling the story of a friend who takes Ecstasy would help bring that subject to life. In an e-mail or letter, you might entertain a friend by narrating your failed attempts to windsurf during a seaside vacation.

We tell stories to teach a lesson, illustrate an idea, or make someone laugh, cry, or get involved. No matter what your narrative is about, every narrative should have a clear point: It should reveal what you want your reader to learn or take away from the story.

To navigate through this chapter's online resources, click the Prepare for Class, Improve Your Grade, and ACE the Test buttons in the blue sidebar on the left.


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